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Hudak On Hollywood is currently scheduling for the 2022-23 season — e-mail dan@hudakonhollywood.com to secure your booking today!

Hudak On Hollywood is currently scheduling for the 2022-23 season — e-mail dan@hudakonhollywood.com!

Want to know the real story behind Marilyn Monroe’s dress flying in the air? Or why Katharine Hepburn didn’t like Meryl Streep? Contact Dan at dan@hudakonhollywood.com for details on how to bring our lectures to you!

Click here to schedule a call to learn about Hudak on Hollywood lectures.

Betsy Schwarm

Betsy Schwarm

Classical Music

Expertise: Classical Music & Opera

Available for in-person lectures in: Denver

Available via Zoom? Yes

To book Betsy, e-mail dan@hudakonhollywood.com

 

Lectures include:

Betsy Schwarm’s lectures are roughly 60 minutes, including time for a Q&A.

Classical Hit Tunes
Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons – Beethoven’s Ode to Joy – Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture – Gershwin’s Summertime:  some of the most beloved classical music is immediately familiar, even to those who would swear they’ve never been to a classical concert.  Classical music historian and frequent public speaker Betsy Schwarm brings her user-friendly approach to the topic.  How did those works become so widely famous?  Does everything that’s well-written become iconic?  Probably not!  Dive into some great music you already know, and learn how it earned its place in the spotlight!

Great Movie Music
A certain bit of music from the original film Psycho might leave some people reluctant to go in the shower.  A splashy, brassy fanfare could have certain listeners imagining light sabers and X-wing fighters.  It’s iconic movie music, often using the same techniques found in the classical concert hall.  Classical music historian and frequent public speaker Betsy Schwarm brings her user-friendly approach to the topic.  Psycho and Star Wars will be just part of the journey:  we’ll also check in with Robin Hood, Scarlett O’Hara, and those two famed lovers on the Titanic.

What’s So Special About Mozart?         
He’s one of the biggest names in classical music, with innumerable famous works and tens of millions of fans.  But why?  What is it about a composer who lived over 200 years ago that is still worthy of attention?  Let’s find out together!  Classical music historian and frequent public speaker Betsy Schwarm brings her user-friendly approach to the topic.  From A Little Night Music to The Marriage of Figaro, find out what made this musical genius special, with lots of musical examples.
[numerous other composers also available:  title, time frame and sample works would be adjusted]

Star-Spangled Classical Music
American composers may not have invented classical music:  they borrowed its concepts from Europe.  From that point onward, they’ve made it their own and given it a distinctive American voice.  Classical music historian and frequent public speaker Betsy Schwarm brings her user-friendly approach to the topic.  Superstars such as Gershwin, Copland, and Sousa will be featured, along with other composers of devotedly American-sounding music.

Classy Ladies:  Women Composers of Classical Music
Beethoven and the boys get most of the attention, but there have also been fine women composers, many earning widespread success and admiration.  Classical music historian and frequent public speaker Betsy Schwarm brings her user-friendly approach to the topic.  From Clara Schumann in 19th century Germany to Cécile Chaminade in early 20th century France to numerous names today, there’s much to explore, including American Caroline Shaw’s Pulitzer Prize winning composition from 2013.  Get to know these classy ladies and their compelling music!

Diverse Voices in Classical Music
Classical music isn’t just something written by white Euro-American guys.  Other cultures have also made their mark, bringing individual cultural voices to the concert hall for all audiences to experience, even alongside Beethoven.  Classical music historian and frequent public speaker Betsy Schwarm brings her user-friendly approach to the topic.  Spaniard Joaquin Rodrigo, American Duke Ellington, and Chinese composer Tan Dun have all been part of the action:  diverse voices bringing personal perspectives to great music.  Concierto de Aranjuez is just a start!

A single one-hour program will cover:
Joaquin Rodrigo (1901 – 1999):  Concierto de Aranjuez (Spain)
Duke Ellington (1899 – 1974):  Black, Brown and Beige (US)
Tan Dun (b. 1957):  Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (China)

If three separate one-hour programs:

Act I:  African Origins               
Chevalier de Saint-Georges (Joseph Bologne) (1745 – 1799):  Violin Concerto in A major, op. 5, no. 2 (Guadeloupe/France)
Samuel Coleridge Taylor (1875 – 1912):  Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast (England)
Florence Price (1887 – 1953):  Symphony no. 3 in c minor (US)
Duke Ellington (1899 – 1974):  Black, Brown and Beige (US)
Justinian Tamusuza (b. 1951):  Ekitundu ekisooka (Uganda)
Billy Childs (b. 1957):  The Vistas of America (US)

Act II: Asian Atmospheres        
Xian Xinghai (1905 – 1945):  Yellow River Cantata (China)
Toru Takemitsu (1930 – 1996):  A String Around Autumn (viola concerto: 1989) (Japan)
He Zhan Hao (b. 1933) & Chen Gang (b. 1935):  Butterfly Lovers Concerto (Japan)
Dia Succari (1938 – 2010):  Suite for clarinet and orchestra, “Paroles” (Syria)
Tan Dun (b. 1957):  Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (China)
Kenji Bunch (b. 1973):  Serenade for flute, violin, and viola (2013) (Japanese American)

Act III: Latin Spirit
Isaac Albéniz (1860 – 1909):  Asturias (Spain)
Carlos Chávez (1899 – 1978):  Sinfonia india (Mexico)
Joaquin Rodrigo (1901 – 1999):  Concierto de Aranjuez (Spain)
Alberto Ginastera (1916 – 1983):  Estancia (Argentina)
Robert Sierra (b. 1953):  Sinfonia no. 3, “La Salsa” (Puerto Rico)
Clarice Assad (b. 1978):  Sin Fronteras (Brazil/US)